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Author Topic: Overheating  (Read 3430 times)

Offline Dave

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Overheating
« on: May 09, 2008, 12:40:42 pm »
The recent hot weather has shown me just how much of a greenhouse my flat is. My frog tank, usually set to 24C, has been hovering at 28C for the last few days. I've been trying a few things to help cool it down and thought a thread on various techniques to help with overheating might be useful.

Im lucky enough to live on the second floor, so I've been able to leave all my windows open, and all the internal doors to get plenty of air flow. I've also been doing small cold water changes every day, leaving the lid open as much as possible (gotta be careful with frogs!), and blocking out all direct sunlight. Also tried reducing lighting time on the tank. Thankfully the weather seems a bit cooler today, I'll be getting a fan this weekend! I even tried hanging a load of wet washing around the place to try some evaporative cooling but that may have been a bit optimistic! :o

Anyway, my ideas... please feel free to add to, or flag up anything stupid!

(1) Electric fan blowing across top of tank (evaporative cooling, probably best/simplest idea)
(2) Float bottles of cold water in your tank if the tank is big enough
(3) This idea of cooling your filter return pipe if you have an external filter (mine are internal)
(4) Increase aeration
(5) Block out as much incident sunlight as possible, reduce lighting times if you can (reduces heat from bulbs)
(6) Regular small (<5%) cold water changes *

Hope that's of some use to people.

* might want to get a second opinion on that, not sure how long it's okay to keep it up for.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2008, 12:43:47 pm by Dave »
Dave

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    Offline guardsbrigade

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    Overheating
    « Reply #1 on: May 09, 2008, 01:30:04 pm »
    Good ideas Dave,i have been having the same problem over the last couple of days,nothing quite as drastic as yours,mine was a couple of degrees above normal.It is worrying though!.Like you i had windows open and the back door.I was toying with the idea of putting one of those cool box blocks in and floating in the tank if it got really bad or soaking a bath towel in cold water and wrapping it round the tank,but luckily it never got that bad !:)

    Offline plankton

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    Overheating
    « Reply #2 on: May 09, 2008, 07:29:35 pm »
    You could try turning the heater off - saves money as well! ;)

    1 or 2 degree changes isn't too bad - it's slow and that happens during the weekly water change anyway....don't over-worry unless it goes well over (or under) the normal temp for too long.
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    Offline fishgeek

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    Overheating
    « Reply #3 on: May 09, 2008, 07:51:41 pm »
    i have hardly had a heater turned on this year, water doesn't go below 20 in my house
    apisto's are the only one's getting heat, cory and shrimp are fine

    Offline Hayley

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    Overheating
    « Reply #4 on: May 09, 2008, 11:18:56 pm »
    I had my windows open and the through draft kept the room temp down, Ok if you're in all day but no good if you work.
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    Offline Dave

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    Overheating
    « Reply #5 on: May 10, 2008, 01:07:34 pm »
    that's what i was thinking hayley... i'm quite often away at weekends, and if I wasn't able to keep the windows open, the temp in my flat would pass 30 on a sunny day, hence the other suggestions
    Dave


    Offline ciderhoover

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    Re: Overheating
    « Reply #6 on: June 20, 2017, 09:00:27 pm »
    Thankyou, Im trying my best but the flat is so hot. Its only a couple of degrees over the green bit on the thermometer but I just cant get it down. Ill have to do a water change tomorrow.

    Offline fishtank

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    Re: Overheating
    « Reply #7 on: June 20, 2017, 10:53:36 pm »
    My tanks are hitting 28-29*c every day this week. One thing I've been doing is freezing 3 small bottles of water and floating them in the tank until they defrost. Brings the temps down a fair bit but not too fast or sudden to cause shock. My tank is 180 litres though so if it was a smaller tank, the temp change might be a bit more drastic in say, a 5gallon for example...
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    Offline Drunken horse

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    Re: Overheating
    « Reply #8 on: June 20, 2017, 11:00:43 pm »
    My tanks that get natural light on during the day have been getting a thick towel thrown over them.  Helps keep the temps down

    Offline dinofred1

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    Re: Overheating
    « Reply #9 on: July 11, 2017, 11:25:26 am »
    I was having the same problem, my tank is in my conservatory so run with no lid on fan running across the top of the tank, use radiator reflectors stuck to my windows ice bottles but still hitting 28 degrees, so went for a tank chiller alright it was dear but managed to get a used one off eBay a TK2000, bit over the top for a 400 liter tank but if it hits 27 it switches on about 40 mins and back down 26, so now I can put the lid on and use my lights so I think worth it.   
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    Offline audigex

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    Re: Overheating
    « Reply #10 on: August 03, 2018, 02:56:28 pm »

    I guess this is relevant again with our very hot summer - but there are definitely some things that can be done


    • Flats will always struggle with a lack of "through" air because the windows are on one side, or perhaps two adjacent walls, making it hard to get a good breeze going. Good fans will help, especially at night when the outside air cools a bit - whenever the air outside is cooler than the air inside, get the window open and a fan set up to blow air from outside
    • Close all curtains during the day, open them at night to let the air pass more easily when it's cooler
    • A white bedsheet hung to block the sun from hitting the tank is a great way to keep it cooler without blocking air circulation around the tank
    • Turn the tank lights off - even LEDs produce heat. Your fish don't need the light, and your plants will survive a couple of days during the worst of the weather
    • Turn anything else off in the room... your TV, Sky Box, stereo, cooker etc in the room all produce heat and warm the air up, which warms the tank up. If possible, you can even spend less time in the room to reduce your own heat output
    • Unless your fish are jumpers, open the tank hood. If possible, point a fan at the surface. Evaporation is a great way to cool the tank
    • Bags of ice cost ~£1 from the supermarket. Dropping one in the tank is a handy emergency measure. Just don't throw three of them in a small tank unattended... and don't put ice cubes directly into the tank, your fish may try to eat them and be hurt, they aren't designed to cope with that.
    • If you know warm weather is coming in a few days, knock your heaters down a couple of degrees to give the temperature a head start on the weather.
    • A 10% water change in a 28 degree tank will drop your temperature over 2 degrees, you don't have to go nuts, but it's a way to keep things in check
    • Air conditioners aren't that expensive to buy (£250 ish), and while they aren't cheap to run, if you're mainly running it for an hour at a time to keep the temperature sensible it won't be too bad. Plus you get to enjoy a cool room...
    I personally like the air conditioner approach. It's about 1/5th of the price of a decent chiller, and cooling the room down is just as effective for keeping the tank cool. Plus you get to enjoy the cooler room too. A couple of hours a day of my air con running full blast costs me £23 a month, so that's £250 up front and <£50 a year considering we realistically have less than 60 really hot days a year, and it's not usually running full blast for that 2 hours. And seriously, I can't over-state how much nicer it is when you can sit in a cool room watching your fish, rather than dashing around in a hot room trying to do emergency water changes...