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Author Topic: Tank Evolution  (Read 31320 times)

turtlemusketeer

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Re: Tank Evolution
« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2017, 10:01:00 pm »
Hello :)

Generally speaking unless it's salt-laden or calcite (eg limestone, which raises the acidity of the water and can affect the chem balance) it's okay.

As for plants, CO2 and fertiliser are vital, otherwise they just die and add to the bioload in the tank. Plastic plants can look weirdly efferctive if they're arranged well... Have attached a pic of mine - let me know if it works :)

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    Offline Si4geckos

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #16 on: March 07, 2017, 10:34:34 pm »
    Sand on top of some form of aqua base will grow plants fine. Unless your adding pressurised co2 the lights will be fine just keep to slow growing plants.

    Also I have found that some carpeting plants find it harder to root through really fine sand which can become compacted. Go for a slightly larger grain size.

    What fish do you intend to keep? If the rocks are releasing minerals then it could increase water hardness. Test the water in the bucket before and after adding to see what the impact is?

    Hello.

    I'm keeping mainly sterbai cory, few guppies, Cardinal tetra and one male dwarf gourami. Mainly soft water fish apart from the guppies who are slowly dying off due to age.

    I'll do some water tests over the weekend and see what happens. Very much fingers crossed though. Tank will look awesome with these.

    I'll try and get some bigger grain sand too as I'll need more for the larger tank.


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    Offline Si4geckos

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #17 on: March 07, 2017, 10:36:16 pm »
    Hello :)

    Generally speaking unless it's salt-laden or calcite (eg limestone, which raises the acidity of the water and can affect the chem balance) it's okay.

    As for plants, CO2 and fertiliser are vital, otherwise they just die and add to the bioload in the tank. Plastic plants can look weirdly efferctive if they're arranged well... Have attached a pic of mine - let me know if it works :)


    That is nice, but I think more rocks with a few live plants is where I'll end up. I've got lots of fake plants and they look good, but just trying to get a really natural look if I can.


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    Offline Gingerlove05

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #18 on: March 07, 2017, 11:52:29 pm »
    Easiest way to test the rock to see if it will leach anything into the water is drop a bit of vinegar on it, if it fizzes it will leach minerals ;)


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    Offline Si4geckos

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #19 on: March 08, 2017, 01:05:24 pm »
    Not sure about the rocks. Tried vinegar, but can't hear or see any fizzing.

    However, when cleaning them with a scrubbing brush, they just keep shedding like a chalky coating making the water murky and grey. Gonna leave them soaking til weekend and see what the water looks like. Not optimistic though.

    Sad times  *bye3*

    Offline Si4geckos

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #20 on: March 10, 2017, 05:18:33 pm »
    So I've been doing some experimenting with the rock:

    Smashing it...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsDS8EeOXhY

    Soaking and scrubbing it....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-s95QUifs8c

    I've also just spent 20 mins boiling a piece to see what happens.

    The results:

    Smashing - rock feels soft(ish) as far as rock goes
    Soaking and scrubbing  - even after a massive soaking and lots of scrubbing the rocks still give off dust with abrasion. With no contact they look fine with no visible discharge.
    Boiling - Surprisingly the rock didn't soften or disfigure. There were a few tiny shards in the pan after boiling, but the water was clear and clean.

    I did notice a tiny shimmer to the rock as in lots of shiny tiny specs. Could this be metallic elements and thus be dangerous?

    Any thoughts on what rock it is?

    Is it possible to seal it in any way??

    Should I find a geology forum?

    Thanks

    PS - sorry for the random weird videos!
    « Last Edit: March 10, 2017, 07:35:03 pm by Si4geckos »

    Offline ajm83

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #21 on: March 10, 2017, 07:10:39 pm »
    maybe i'm missing something but it looks like normal slate?

    Offline Si4geckos

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #22 on: March 10, 2017, 07:37:56 pm »
    maybe i'm missing something but it looks like normal slate?

    It's just how to confirm that before adding it to a tank? It's similar to slate, but I've only have roof slate before and that seems a lot more brittle, more dense and sharper when broken. Roof slate tends to shatter rather than crack.

    Could be slate though. Just trying to work out how to tell for definite??

    Offline Vale!

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #23 on: March 10, 2017, 08:00:50 pm »
    There's a sequence of rock formation that begins with clay/mud ... which gets compressed to form mudstone of varying solidities ... which then becomes mudstone with feeble layers .. and finally, after a lot more compression, becomes slate.  My guess is that it belongs somewhere within that sequence.   As it's essentially clay, it would be unusual for it to pose a health problem for fish (unless it were obviously contaminated with (say) heavy metals) but the less it's been compressed, the more likely it is to 'muddy' ones water!

    The shimmering specks are likely to be mica or pyrites ; neither would be problematic (even though the latter contains sulphur, it's quite stable under aquarium-type conditions, I think - but do double-check that).

    Offline Si4geckos

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #24 on: March 10, 2017, 08:23:35 pm »
    There's a sequence of rock formation that begins with clay/mud ... which gets compressed to form mudstone of varying solidities ... which then becomes mudstone with feeble layers .. and finally, after a lot more compression, becomes slate.  My guess is that it belongs somewhere within that sequence.   As it's essentially clay, it would be unusual for it to pose a health problem for fish (unless it were obviously contaminated with (say) heavy metals) but the less it's been compressed, the more likely it is to 'muddy' ones water!

    The shimmering specks are likely to be mica or pyrites ; neither would be problematic (even though the latter contains sulphur, it's quite stable under aquarium-type conditions, I think - but do double-check that).

    That does make sense. I tested the tap water today and got a ph of 6.5 and very low KH. GH test didnt work properly and ended up saying I had super hard water, even though I know it's very soft. (Test kit was inherited for GH so not convinced it worked).

    I've left 3 larger rocks in some water and will test in a couple of days to see whats happened.

    It did muddy that water badly initially, but everything settled on the bottom and the water cleared within 48hrs with no filer, etc. Plus I've not properly washed much of the rock yet as I'm not sure it's worth the effort as yet.

    I'll try and check the water and buy some white vinegar to see if any fizzing occurs with that rather than normal malt vinegar.

    It's hard identifying rocks!  :mad:

    Thanks for the reply.

    Offline Vale!

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #25 on: March 10, 2017, 08:47:57 pm »
    Whether the vinegar is malt or white shouldn't matter.

    re : the GH kit.  Yes - I remember not so long ago I went to #1 LFS and begged a quick GH test (I'm always begging them for such stuff!) because I'd run out and couldn't justify buying a new refill. They lent me a bottle of reagent and I bore it triumphantly home.  It didn't work - after about forty drops there was still no colour change. So I went back and they dug around in the chaos that is their bin full of test kits and came up with another. That didn't work either : same result.  They cracked open a new one and that worked perfectly. It was impossible to tell how old the non-working kits were but it was obvious that these GH kits become more unreliable as time goes by until, at last, they conk out altogether.

    Offline Si4geckos

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #26 on: March 10, 2017, 08:54:10 pm »
    Whether the vinegar is malt or white shouldn't matter.

    re : the GH kit.  Yes - I remember not so long ago I went to #1 LFS and begged a quick GH test (I'm always begging them for such stuff!) because I'd run out and couldn't justify buying a new refill. They lent me a bottle of reagent and I bore it triumphantly home.  It didn't work - after about forty drops there was still no colour change. So I went back and they dug around in the chaos that is their bin full of test kits and came up with another. That didn't work either : same result.  They cracked open a new one and that worked perfectly. It was impossible to tell how old the non-working kits were but it was obvious that these GH kits become more unreliable as time goes by until, at last, they conk out altogether.

    Are the test strips worth bothering with for gh and kh?

    I thought white vinegar was more acidic? Could be wrong though.

    Offline Vale!

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #27 on: March 10, 2017, 09:11:44 pm »
    Even if there is a differential, the vinegar that's less acidic should still evoke a reaction from a substrate that might be significantly aggressive, KH-wise.  But if you want to try both, please do - I'd be interested to know if there's indeed a difference!  White vinegar's not as good on chips, though, is it?

    When I compared new test strips (I've forgotten which brand) to liquid kits I found that they compared really quite favourably so far as GH/KH were concerned ; not at all as alarming as some reports would have it!
    « Last Edit: March 10, 2017, 09:23:39 pm by Vale! »

    Offline Si4geckos

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #28 on: March 13, 2017, 02:10:23 pm »
    Well, after 3 days of soaking the rocks, the water ph has risen from around 6.5 to around 7.8.  *blink*

    Does this mean they're unsuitable for use in my 'softwater' community tank?

    Will PH continue to rise or would that be the maximum it would go to?

    What are my options? Would I be able to seal them in any way??

    Would they be suitable/ useful for a different type water tank?

    Thoughts appreciated.  :mad:

    Offline plankton

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    Re: Tank Evolution
    « Reply #29 on: March 14, 2017, 09:36:42 am »
    They certainly sound as though they are reactionary, so not for softwater.
    I believe (not sure where I got this from) that rocks that do leach stop at 7.8ph, but that might not be true.......may have been when I researched African Rift Lake fish randomly one day when I had no intention of getting any........
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